fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
This is an excellent article. "5 internet life lessons parents need to start teaching kids." I especially like their advice that you can never be too cynical when it comes to scams. Something I take to heart. I even once ignored a person who may or may not have been a scammer in real life, once. It was at WinCo, a grocery store, a couple months ago; this guy, sounding all desperate and stuff, told me he needed some food right away and his food stamps wouldn't activate for another few days. He asked me to buy him some things and he would pay me back. My thoughts were these: "*Tries to process data* This makes no sense. If he has money to pay me with now, why not just spend it himself? If he is telling the truth and will pay me back later, I'm supposed to wait how long, exactly, and give this stranger my contact info? I don't even like loaning to friends, and I'm going to loan my food stamps benefits to this guy I don't even know? Most likely it's a scam. Even if it's not a scam, no fucking way I'm taking the risk for some random guy I don't know."

Then I flat out told him, "Sorry, not falling for your little scam" and walked off. He protested that he wasn't scamming, but better to let him think that "this is a scammer" was my one and only thought than try to explain, "Even if you're telling the truth, I'm not risking it." I do not regret my actions. If the guy really can't wait for food stamps, he can go to one of those churches that gives hungry people free food. Idiot really should know better than to do things like that in this day and age.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
First, and really least important: My Wacom Fun graphics tablet came today! Using it is gonna take some getting used to, but I'm already kinda getting the hang of it. I love how it works like an improved mouse, too, with gestures for scrolling and navigation and selection, etc. But of course, drawing is what I bought it for. I'll test that more in-depth later.

Second, and most important: The apartment I was trying for, the one that is a couple blocks from Brooke's, is now mine! I can start moving in! I have the power in my name, and signed up for phone and Internet through Qwest. The phone and Internet will be turned on this Friday. I am so thrilled! :-)

It's on the ground floor, is nice and roomy, has a huge closet, lots of storage space, an extra storage thing in the laundry room (lockable), and a nice view of the trees and stuff out back. Also, ironically (since I don't have a car or any other motorized vehicle), I have the best parking spot in the building. But that's still good, cuz friends with cars can park there. :-) Oh yeah, and since I get my Internet through Qwest and Brooke gets hers through Comcast, odds are good if one of our Internets went down, the other's would still be up, so we could "borrow a cup of Internet" from each other if the need arose. :-D

Anyway, gonna start moving stuff over now! :-D

Oh wow.

Aug. 30th, 2010 06:17 pm
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
I was reading something on Cracked earlier, and came across this (emphasis mine)

That's the positivity effect. Happy memories tend to remain in your mind in more vivid details, while negative memories fade

Now, you probably have a moody friend who is scoffing at this, because he can spout a long list of ways life has wronged them over the ears. Or, maybe you're that friend.
That process doesn't work in people suffering from depression. They tend not to remember vivid details of memory at all, exchanging it instead for just a vague memory of how lame everything is all the time because their life just sucks and stuff. (Link)

Gee, I have had depression to some degree or another since I was about 5 or 6. My childhood memory is a blur, with a scattering of vivid memories remembered out of order. My memory of the rest of my life isn't much better. I wonder if this is why.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
I had a fuckton of dreams last night. Some were interesting, others were just my brain being bored. (I can tell which ones those were, they were the dreams about reading my LJ friends page or dreams about playing games.) Most aren't worth talking about even if I remembered them. However, there is a major exception: I had a high-definition dream last night.

It started with some lesser dream about getting a job opportunity, and all I had to do to get the job was return this styrofoam chicken head to this huge business with a chicken head for a logo, though the job wasn't with them - the chicken-head business was apparently like Wal-Mart in that they wanted to get their hands in everything, and they were also in the business of finding jobs for people.

Anyway, there I was walking across the parking lot when the setting changed faster than I could see, and I was then walking across a park. I saw lots of groups of people, including a group playing soccer. As soon as the setting changed, the dream quality shot up dramatically into the high detail of reality and I was like, "WTF? Where am I, and how did I get here?" I kept walking, hoping to find out where I was and how to get back home. The park gained altitude in one direction, and it wasn't until I'd quickly scaled a very big hill without much effort that I realized I must be dreaming.

At the top of the hill, there was a gravel path. Deciding I wanted to go faster, I grabbed the air as though grabbing handlebars, and mounted an invisible bicycle. I started riding around. The gravel and trees became a nice little mountain neighborhood with houses and roads. It was really interesting and a little scary when the road would turn so sharply and without warning that I'd fly off into the air and have to ride my invisible bike back to the road; it happened several times before I stopped at the shore of some lake or something, where there were a whole bunch of people swimming nude or hanging out nude on the shore. I got off my invisible bike and joined them, since it was a nudist beach.

The dream kept going after that, but my memory gets a bit fuzzy after that point. At one point, I was eating something in the dream and could actually taste it! I don't know how long the dream lasted, but it was the longest high-definition dream I've had to date.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
I have another gift that I've been meaning to post about for a long time, and only just now remembered to. I have the ability to tell if a vintage style photo really is vintage or if it's modern and made to look vintage. But it only works if there are people in the photo. The way it works is, no matter how good the fake vintage photo, there are differences between modern people and people in the past, that can't be covered up. I don't even know what all the differences are. I just know that a faked 1910 photo won't pass me by; you can take a person short enough for the era, dress them up in authentic clothes, and put them in a photo setting the same as one in common 1910 photos, simulate the degradation of the photo perfectly, and even print the photo on glass, and it wouldn't fool me. I just have this sense of when someone doesn't fit into the supposed time. I think I could spot time travelers with this sense.

I know this because I can always pick out the fake antique photos.

Not sure HOW I can tell when someone doesn't belong in a certain time, I just can. I'm wondering if it's connected to my ability to judge people's character just by looking at them? Or maybe I'm seeing their souls. Or it could even be a case of subtle physical or body language differences.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
Apparently, there are two kinds of male dung beetles, the ones with big horns, and ones with no horns. How is this? Because while the horned males are fighting, the hornless males sneak into the burrows and sex up the females. And the hornless males have giant bug testicles. Bigger than the bug testicles of the males with giant horns.

This has interesting implications for worldbuilding. I talked some weeks ago about species with vast differences between the genders, but this brings to mind a neat thought: what if there were an alien species where males and females look very dissimilar, AND there are two different kinds of males.

(I wish I could remember the phrase that means "when there are extreme physical differences between the genders.")

!O_O!

Jun. 19th, 2010 10:31 pm
fayanora: ahh! (ahh!)
What the fuck did this guy do to deserve that life?

Tarrare was slim and of average height. He was described as having unusually soft fair hair, and an abnormally wide mouth in which his teeth were heavily stained, and on which the lips were almost invisible. When he had not eaten his skin would hang so loosely that he could wrap the fold of skin from his abdomen around his waist, and when full his abdomen would distend "like a huge balloon". The skin of his cheeks was wrinkled and hung loosely, and when stretched out he was able to hold twelve eggs or apples in his mouth. His body was hot to the touch and he sweated heavily and constantly suffered from foul body odour; he was described as "stinking to such a degree that he could not be endured at twenty paces". This smell would get noticeably worse after he had eaten, his eyes and cheeks would become bloodshot, a visible vapour would rise from his body, and he would become lethargic, during which time he would belch noisily and his jaws would make swallowing motions. He suffered from chronic diarrhoea, which was said to be "fetid beyond all conception". Despite his large intake of food he did not appear either to vomit excessively or to gain weight.

A meal had been prepared for 15 labourers near the hospital gates; although generally hospital staff restrained Tarrare in the presence of food, on this occasion Courville allowed him to reach the table undisturbed. Tarrare ate the entire meal of two large meat pies, plates of grease and salt and four gallons of milk, and then immediately fell asleep; [...] On another occasion Tarrare was presented with a live cat. He tore the cat's abdomen open with his teeth and drank its blood, and proceeded to eat the entire cat aside from its bones, before vomiting up its fur and skin. Following this, hospital staff offered Tarrare a variety of other animals including snakes, lizards and puppies, all of which were eaten; he also swallowed an entire eel without chewing, having first crushed its head with his teeth. [...]

Efforts to keep him on any kind of controlled diet failed; he would sneak out of the hospital to scavenge for offal outside butchers' shops and to fight stray dogs for carrion in gutters, alleys and rubbish heaps. He was also caught several times within the hospital drinking from patients undergoing bloodletting, and attempting to eat the bodies in the hospital mortuary. Other doctors believed that Tarrare was mentally ill and pressed for him to be transferred to a lunatic asylum, but Percy was keen to continue his experiments and Tarrare remained in the military hospital.

After some time, a 14-month old child disappeared from the hospital, and Tarrare was immediately suspected. Percy was unable or unwilling to defend him, and the hospital staff chased Tarrare from the hospital, to which he never returned.

- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarrare

Uberman

Feb. 15th, 2010 06:38 pm
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
I read recently about a sleep schedule called Uberman. What you do is take 20 minute naps every 4 hours, and not much longer than that. They say that at first, you will feel like crap while you get adjusted to the schedule, but finally your brain gives up and goes with it, and instead of waiting to go into REM sleep (the kind of sleep that makes you feel rested and refreshed), it starts going straight into REM sleep. Most people on ordinary sleep schedules only get about an hour and a half of REM sleep each night. With Uberman, once you get used to it, you end up having 2 hours of REM sleep every day. You only get 2 hours of sleep, period, under this system, but it ends up being all REM sleep.

Since I sleep over 8 hours a night usually and almost never feel really rested, I'm considering trying this out. Especially since I have a tendency anyway of dreaming during naps, and almost never have a nap longer than 40 minutes. Also, it seems to me that cats already do something like this.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
This article
is interesting
, and I believe its research is valid, but I
disagree with the interpretation of the results. It basically says
that the part of the brains of people on the autism spectrum that
process information when thinking about oneself fire just the same
amount as the part that thinks about other people. This is different
from "normal" (neurotypical) people, whose brains have give more space
to processing data about other people.

Their interpretation of this data was that people on the autistic
spectrum have a less developed sense of self. *Sigh* That's pretty
much exactly the opposite of what they believed before this new data
came in. But from other studies I've read about, observations of
myself, and observations of other people (neurotypical and otherwise),
I think there's another option they've failed to consider. I think it
means that auties/aspies have more self-reflection capabilities than
neurotypical people do. It gets better: I also believe, from other
studies I've read about, that auties/aspies get more data from other
people than neurotypical people do. They go on and on about aspies not
being able to discern body language, but I think what's really going
on is that we get too much body language information, and can't
tell what information is important to social situations and what
isn't. Taking myself as an example, as long as I can remember I have
had the ability to read people like a book, getting an accurate
picture of their personality from just a few seconds to a few minutes
of observation. I think part of it is because I can tell when people
are lying, either to themselves or to others. Where I think I had
problems growing up is in other people's reactions to my having this
information. It makes many people uncomfortable to know that anyone
can know them so well, and so people who count on their facade being
impenetrable (bullies, for example) will react to that discomfiting
idea. It didn't help that I've always been very androgynous even in my
behavior.
Another problem is that, when I was a young child, I couldn't tell the
difference between a lie told to others and a lie told to oneself, so
often I was able to see things about people that they were denying to
themselves, wouldn't let themselves recognize, let alone anyone else.
And I had no compunction, in my early years, from telling them what I
could sense of them.
One last thing in that vein: I was also uncomfortable with other
people's discomfort. I've always been able to feel other people's
emotions. In fact, the last few years I've pushed my own emotions back
so far that I can feel other people's emotions more clearly than I can
feel my own. And as a child, I didn't know how to ignore flood of
emotive information, so I retreated inside and lived in a fantasy
world for most of my childhood. Lately I've been thinking that
autistics probably have it even worse than aspies, and are so unable
to cope with the overwhelming flood of information that they have to
shut off the whole world to survive it. It reminds me of the TV show
Charmed, the episode where Prue is given the empathic gift, but she's
not prepared for it, so it's driving her insane.

I was also thinking on the way here that being an aspie or autie in
this society is kind of like being one of the few people who can see
color in a society full of color-blind people. How do you talk about
colors with people who can't see them? How can you even conceptualize
colors to yourself when no one around you talks about them? Hell, if
you were born color-seeing in such a world, how would you even realize
that you were different from others when no one talks about colors?
Imagine color-blind people wearing horrible color combonations (bright
red with neon blue polka dots or some such, something that looks like
it's moving when you see it), and you're getting overwhelmed by the
sickening color combonations, but no one can figure out what's wrong
with you because they have no concept of "color" beyond black, white,
and grey. Lacking any concept of what you're going through, they
project their own interpretation onto you. Some say you can only see
blacks and greys but not whites, others say you can only see whites
and greys but not black, or only white and black but not greys, when
the answer is "none of the above."

I believe this to be the true interpretation because I'm an aspie and
I'm empathic. So is Lilla. Even her ex-boyfriend Jordan, who had an
extreme case of Asperger's, could feel other people's emotions (even
when he couldn't figure out their reasons). I believe people on the
autism spectrum are, thus, a mutation. We're evolving as a species,
and I think one day most people will be aspies or high-functioning
autistics. But even if that hope isn't true, I *do* believe
autism/asperger's is a mutation, a surplus of ability rather than a
lack. And being too good at something can become as maladaptive in
some societies as being disabled. In a society of the blind, the one
eyed people can make others uncomfortable. People try to feel better
about their discomfort by calling it a disability; they may not be
able to admit to themselves that the prospect of it being an
improvement scares them.

Thoughts?

EDITED TO ADD: I hear neurotypical people going on and on about how aspies only see the world in terms of black and white supposedly, but I've seen far more black-and-white thinking among neurotypical people than I have among aspies. Everyone's guilty of it on at least a few things, but neurotypical people are far more guilty of it than aspies, in my experience. I think because having so much brain power devoted to self-reflection lets us get a clearer picture of our thoughts, and leans us in that direction more than NTs.
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
This article
is interesting
, and I believe its research is valid, but I
disagree with the interpretation of the results. It basically says
that the part of the brains of people on the autism spectrum that
process information when thinking about oneself fire just the same
amount as the part that thinks about other people. This is different
from "normal" (neurotypical) people, whose brains have give more space
to processing data about other people.

Their interpretation of this data was that people on the autistic
spectrum have a less developed sense of self. *Sigh* That's pretty
much exactly the opposite of what they believed before this new data
came in. But from other studies I've read about, observations of
myself, and observations of other people (neurotypical and otherwise),
I think there's another option they've failed to consider. I think it
means that auties/aspies have more self-reflection capabilities than
neurotypical people do. It gets better: I also believe, from other
studies I've read about, that auties/aspies get more data from other
people than neurotypical people do. They go on and on about aspies not
being able to discern body language, but I think what's really going
on is that we get too much body language information, and can't
tell what information is important to social situations and what
isn't. Taking myself as an example, as long as I can remember I have
had the ability to read people like a book, getting an accurate
picture of their personality from just a few seconds to a few minutes
of observation. I think part of it is because I can tell when people
are lying, either to themselves or to others. Where I think I had
problems growing up is in other people's reactions to my having this
information. It makes many people uncomfortable to know that anyone
can know them so well, and so people who count on their facade being
impenetrable (bullies, for example) will react to that discomfiting
idea. It didn't help that I've always been very androgynous even in my
behavior.
Another problem is that, when I was a young child, I couldn't tell the
difference between a lie told to others and a lie told to oneself, so
often I was able to see things about people that they were denying to
themselves, wouldn't let themselves recognize, let alone anyone else.
And I had no compunction, in my early years, from telling them what I
could sense of them.
One last thing in that vein: I was also uncomfortable with other
people's discomfort. I've always been able to feel other people's
emotions. In fact, the last few years I've pushed my own emotions back
so far that I can feel other people's emotions more clearly than I can
feel my own. And as a child, I didn't know how to ignore flood of
emotive information, so I retreated inside and lived in a fantasy
world for most of my childhood. Lately I've been thinking that
autistics probably have it even worse than aspies, and are so unable
to cope with the overwhelming flood of information that they have to
shut off the whole world to survive it. It reminds me of the TV show
Charmed, the episode where Prue is given the empathic gift, but she's
not prepared for it, so it's driving her insane.

I was also thinking on the way here that being an aspie or autie in
this society is kind of like being one of the few people who can see
color in a society full of color-blind people. How do you talk about
colors with people who can't see them? How can you even conceptualize
colors to yourself when no one around you talks about them? Hell, if
you were born color-seeing in such a world, how would you even realize
that you were different from others when no one talks about colors?
Imagine color-blind people wearing horrible color combonations (bright
red with neon blue polka dots or some such, something that looks like
it's moving when you see it), and you're getting overwhelmed by the
sickening color combonations, but no one can figure out what's wrong
with you because they have no concept of "color" beyond black, white,
and grey. Lacking any concept of what you're going through, they
project their own interpretation onto you. Some say you can only see
blacks and greys but not whites, others say you can only see whites
and greys but not black, or only white and black but not greys, when
the answer is "none of the above."

I believe this to be the true interpretation because I'm an aspie and
I'm empathic. So is Lilla. Even her ex-boyfriend Jordan, who had an
extreme case of Asperger's, could feel other people's emotions (even
when he couldn't figure out their reasons). I believe people on the
autism spectrum are, thus, a mutation. We're evolving as a species,
and I think one day most people will be aspies or high-functioning
autistics. But even if that hope isn't true, I *do* believe
autism/asperger's is a mutation, a surplus of ability rather than a
lack. And being too good at something can become as maladaptive in
some societies as being disabled. In a society of the blind, the one
eyed people can make others uncomfortable. People try to feel better
about their discomfort by calling it a disability; they may not be
able to admit to themselves that the prospect of it being an
improvement scares them.

Thoughts?

EDITED TO ADD: I hear neurotypical people going on and on about how aspies only see the world in terms of black and white supposedly, but I've seen far more black-and-white thinking among neurotypical people than I have among aspies. Everyone's guilty of it on at least a few things, but neurotypical people are far more guilty of it than aspies, in my experience. I think because having so much brain power devoted to self-reflection lets us get a clearer picture of our thoughts, and leans us in that direction more than NTs.
fayanora: moonphase kiss (moonphase kiss)
Going through my friends list, I come across this BoingBoing post that has a video about how to speed read. The text under the video says:

"In this short video Kris Madden shows you how to read faster. The trick, he says, is to repeatedly say "AEIOU" or "one, two, three, four," as you read. This prevents you from vocalizing the written words with your larynx. Once you train yourself, you can stop uttering "AEIOU," and you will be able to read much faster than before, or so he says."

Um... just one problem with that. They're saying, basically, to read without subvocalizing it or translating it into sound in one's head even. I dunno about you, but I can't parse written language without an auditory component. If I'm not reading the words subvocally or into in-head sound, then the words and letters become just meaningless pictures to me.

Furthermore, I couldn't do their trick of repeating AEIOU or 1,2,3,4 ... not without slowing down my reading speed. My brain can multitask awesomely on some things, but not in this particular case. If I was trying to read something while repeating AEIOU, my brain would be like "Hey wait, WTF? Stop, read that over again!" because I would be unable to process the written words and subvocalize something unrelated at the same time. It's like how some people can't pat their head and rub their belly at the same time - I can't read and say something unrelated at the same time. I have to pause my reading to say something. Okay, not 100% true actually... but whenever I *do* read and speak something unrelated at the same time, it's the autopilot part of the brain "reading" in that case; in other words, my eyes are moving but no information is actually reaching my brain, and so I have to go back and re-read it consciously to get the information out of it.

I do have a tendency to skim a lot, though. It's kind of like speed-reading, but it isn't speed reading. I look at the beginnings and endings of paragraphs, I look for things in quotation marks, bold, italic, or underline, and I read a lot of partial sentences. When I skim, I'm looking for things interesting enough to warrant reading further. I do this a lot with long posts on my friends page, because I have difficulties reading the entirety of long posts online, and so I skim through long posts to decide if it's worth reading further. If it's not, I either respond to what little I've read (doesn't happen often) or ignore it and move on.

So all in all, not a very helpful tip for someone like me. I guess that means I'll never be a speed reader.
fayanora: pensive (pensive)
A friend of [livejournal.com profile] kengr's, who has fibromyalgia (the friend, not kengr), told me today that one of the ways fibromyalgia can be triggered is thus: the brain sends out pain signals meant to tell the individual "STOP THAT! YOU'RE MAKING THE DAMAGE WORSE!" and the person ignores the pain. The brain, thinking it's not getting through, goes into overload, turning on ALL the pain receptors. (And given the other stories I've heard, cancer and other diseases can do the same thing). Another trigger is getting the wrong treatment, like treatments that make the problems worse.

And it occurred to me just now that a major reason for people ignoring pain like that is because Western society has this mentality of "Why aren't you working?" "I'm injured and in pain, sir." "An injury? Pain? What lame excuses! BACK TO WORK, WAGE SLAVE! Yah! Yah!" *whip cracks* Thus, people ignore the pain and keep working, sometimes not even taking the time to go to the hospital or doctor because they wouldn't get paid and they can't monetarily afford to do that in the short term. But even those who don't get fibromyalgia end up worse off in the long run. So this is why we need socialized medicine: because ignoring problems can make them worse or trigger all new problems, like fibromyalgia (continuous pain for the rest of one's life). And since fibromyalgia is extremely difficult to treat (nothing cures it, nothing kills the pain for long, treatments that work for some people make other peoples' symptoms worse, etc), better to create a system where there's as little opportunity for fibromyalgia to be triggered as possible.
fayanora: Dakota & Elle by LJ user dancingwithme (Dakota & Elle)
A friend of [personal profile] kengr's, who has fibromyalgia (the friend, not kengr), told me today that one of the ways fibromyalgia can be triggered is thus: the brain sends out pain signals meant to tell the individual "STOP THAT! YOU'RE MAKING THE DAMAGE WORSE!" and the person ignores the pain. The brain, thinking it's not getting through, goes into overload, turning on ALL the pain receptors. (And given the other stories I've heard, cancer and other diseases can do the same thing). Another trigger is getting the wrong treatment, like treatments that make the problems worse.

And it occurred to me just now that a major reason for people ignoring pain like that is because Western society has this mentality of "Why aren't you working?" "I'm injured and in pain, sir." "An injury? Pain? What lame excuses! BACK TO WORK, WAGE SLAVE! Yah! Yah!" *whip cracks* Thus, people ignore the pain and keep working, sometimes not even taking the time to go to the hospital or doctor because they wouldn't get paid and they can't monetarily afford to do that in the short term. But even those who don't get fibromyalgia end up worse off in the long run. So this is why we need socialized medicine: because ignoring problems can make them worse or trigger all new problems, like fibromyalgia (continuous pain for the rest of one's life). And since fibromyalgia is extremely difficult to treat (nothing cures it, nothing kills the pain for long, treatments that work for some people make other peoples' symptoms worse, etc), better to create a system where there's as little opportunity for fibromyalgia to be triggered as possible.

Neat

Jul. 7th, 2009 06:48 am
fayanora: Lolita (Lolita)


The robot in the video above reminds me of one of my races in "Carbon and Silicon," the race called The Riders. They exist as pure data, jumping from computer to computer as need be, and if they need a physical body for a task, they generally like to remote control the body (less risk to them that way).
fayanora: SK avatar (Sammi Hanratty)
Neat article, it says:

A groundbreaking study suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger's do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others' emotions too intensely to cope.

People with Asperger's syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is a response to being overwhelmed by emotion – an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with the "intense world" theory, a new way of thinking about the nature of autism.

As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, the theory suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency but, rather, a hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.


My thoughts:

The whole "Aspies lack empathy" thing never made any sense to me. Especially in my own case. Sure, I have trouble reading body language, but I have long been able to feel people's emotions like a sixth sense. And a few years ago, when I was still living with my parents, I spent a year or more caring a lot about what was going on in the world... in fact, I cared so much I drove myself to the brink of madness, even having fits of paranoia and other phobias I'd never had before. Events in my life forced me to get off that kind of thinking, thankfully. But even now I tend to care too much about the crap going on in the world around me and I have to either shut my emotions off for awhile to cool down, or balance out the effect with good news.

The hyperstimulation from social situations theory makes a lot of sense also insofar as Aspies tend to have at least one sense that is hypersensitive. Mine is vision: I notice things most people don't, and I can memorize places to a bizarre level of detail so much so that I can still remember precisely what the Buffet at Terrible's Lakeside Casino looked like before they remodeled, and that was way back in 2005. I can also remember all the details of every stage of the remodeling, even if it was up for only a day (as long as I was there that day). My room-mate's hyper-attuned sense is her hearing: music I can barely hear when it's playing right in front of me, she can hear loudly and clearly three or four rooms away. My Dad has a similar hyper-attuned hearing, one of the many reasons I suspect he might be an Aspie too.

It also makes sense because I can barely tolerate my own emotions sometimes. Also, I used to think I was a loner by nature but have since discovered that I need other people in my life, especially where I can touch them... touching, especially cuddling, is so important to me that when I lived by myself in Osceola and had almost no physical contact with anyone, I nearly went crazy. (I had other issues, too, but that was a BIG one.) I've since figured out that I'm not a loner: I just need to be by myself sometimes to recharge, since other people's emotions just overwhelm me; it's exhausting being around other people sometimes. (Though when they're happy, I can be around them longer usually.)
fayanora: doughnut (doughnut)
Neat article, it says:

A groundbreaking study suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger's do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others' emotions too intensely to cope.

People with Asperger's syndrome, a high functioning form of autism, are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is a response to being overwhelmed by emotion – an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?

This idea resonates with many people suffering from autism-spectrum disorders and their families. It also jibes with the "intense world" theory, a new way of thinking about the nature of autism.

As posited by Henry and Kamila Markram of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, the theory suggests that the fundamental problem in autism-spectrum disorders is not a social deficiency but, rather, a hypersensitivity to experience, which includes an overwhelming fear response.


My thoughts:

The whole "Aspies lack empathy" thing never made any sense to me. Especially in my own case. Sure, I have trouble reading body language, but I have long been able to feel people's emotions like a sixth sense. And a few years ago, when I was still living with my parents, I spent a year or more caring a lot about what was going on in the world... in fact, I cared so much I drove myself to the brink of madness, even having fits of paranoia and other phobias I'd never had before. Events in my life forced me to get off that kind of thinking, thankfully. But even now I tend to care too much about the crap going on in the world around me and I have to either shut my emotions off for awhile to cool down, or balance out the effect with good news.

The hyperstimulation from social situations theory makes a lot of sense also insofar as Aspies tend to have at least one sense that is hypersensitive. Mine is vision: I notice things most people don't, and I can memorize places to a bizarre level of detail so much so that I can still remember precisely what the Buffet at Terrible's Lakeside Casino looked like before they remodeled, and that was way back in 2005. I can also remember all the details of every stage of the remodeling, even if it was up for only a day (as long as I was there that day). My room-mate's hyper-attuned sense is her hearing: music I can barely hear when it's playing right in front of me, she can hear loudly and clearly three or four rooms away. My Dad has a similar hyper-attuned hearing, one of the many reasons I suspect he might be an Aspie too.

It also makes sense because I can barely tolerate my own emotions sometimes. Also, I used to think I was a loner by nature but have since discovered that I need other people in my life, especially where I can touch them... touching, especially cuddling, is so important to me that when I lived by myself in Osceola and had almost no physical contact with anyone, I nearly went crazy. (I had other issues, too, but that was a BIG one.) I've since figured out that I'm not a loner: I just need to be by myself sometimes to recharge, since other people's emotions just overwhelm me; it's exhausting being around other people sometimes. (Though when they're happy, I can be around them longer usually.)
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
Potpourri

Funny song: "Reluctant Pirates" by Strong Men Stoop.

Stories that would have been different if they'd had cell phones. "But soft! What SMS through yonder RAZR breaks?"

Funny: Interview with a Dalek!

A comic about a character who knows he's a character in a comic.

52 ways to piss off Naraku. (Explanation, though some of the details are wrong. For example, Kagura was detatched before Kanna was.)

This is awesome: Brainwaves power new brain-to-computer headset. From games will come eventually the ability to control work machines with your mind. Maybe even pilot or drive via mind power.

Cool: Lost Aboriginal Language Revived!

Girl born with a Y chromosome!

Think humans have 46 chromosomes and chimps have 48? Think again!
fayanora: Steph Candy (Steph Candy)
I wish I had a job and money. Because these shirts are freaking AWESOME! DO WANT! DO WANT!

First known vegetarian spider found!

Wow, you mean making drugs legal actually WORKS?

Take a bite out of crime before crime takes a bite out of you. No jokes about "spit or swallow" now!

I have a collection of short stories about a group called the STC (Spontaneous Theatre Cabal), a Discordian cabal, who do all kinds of weird spontaneous weird things. One of the more normal things they did once, in a story called "Hammerstein," looked a lot like this thing that really happened:



More cool and funny videos under the cut )

Blogspot

Apr. 9th, 2009 05:22 pm
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
I have joined Blogger/Blogspot: http://fayanora.blogspot.com/

Here is my first post: http://fayanora.blogspot.com/?zx=808af10f816f57ec

Admittedly, I was upset when I wrote it. But it's worth reading, if only for the list of things that disgust me about society.
I have to admit, being suspected of being a spambot has not helped my mood.

I joined because of this:

An excellent personal tale of being a 40+ year old Aspie. To give you an idea just HOW good it is: I read the whole thing on the computer screen. I almost never read long blocks of text on computer screens unless it's my own writing. That, and I almost cried in public reading it.

A funny quote from there, while she's talking about how she sometimes hates herself for not being neurotypical: "It's like a cat hating herself for not barking."

And oh gods, the uncomfortableness with my body, I SO identify with that. The hardest part of working in a restaurant was that even with clean clothes and being freshly showered, I itch constantly: head, arms, neck, face, etc. It gets even worse when I know I can't scratch the itch. And I fidget. My body is almost always moving, one part of it or another. And every few minutes I go through this complex ritual of popping the air bubbles in my knuckles, my neck, and even the knuckles in my toes (which I can do without touching my feet, even with shoes on). When I walk by strangers on the street, it often triggers the neck part of the ritual.
fayanora: MTF (MTF)
Potpourri

New Portland company delivers large loads with bikes to cut down on delivery trucks clogging up traffic.

Woman suffers stroke, now has a phantom THIRD ARM!

Fun video of Earth from the POV of Martians!

[livejournal.com profile] posthuman_blues kind of mocks this, but I think Segway's new PUMA looks pretty awesome.

[livejournal.com profile] inkytwist wanted to know what this is, and everyone's making smart-aleck remarks, even me. I said "Antarctica in 2 years."

Bizarre extinct Buddhist sect in Japan which participated in extreme self-inflicted torture in search of enlightenment. See, Christians don't have a monopoly on beliefs that contradict the teachings of their founder!

Video: Pocket phonograph, the proto-Walkman!

If you think the American version of LazyTown is weird, get a load of the Icelandic version! I still like it though!

Can't breathe... laughing too hard!

And since these potpourri posts don't have enough embedded videos in them, I give you Danna Paola singing "Chiquita Pero Picosa," with what seems to be a cameo by the Macarena dude toward the end:



(I find it amusing that Latin dancing always looks incredibly sexy even in inappropriate places such as this video by a child singer. And no, not Danna's dancing, but the stuff around 4:05.)

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